/ unique special ones florence - giardino, palazzo & conventino van de gherardesca

September 4, 2011 - Unique Special Ones Florence (Organized by: MAC Group). The international event starred vehicles unique in their kind, all gathered in the striking setting of the Giardino, Palazzo and Conventino of the Gherardesca, today a Four Seasons Hotel. With the cars came their collectors, important managers and businessmen, hailing from all over the world.

Sir John Gaul, the first owner of this car, was a wealthy car enthusiast who was fond of exhibiting his cars at the most important Concours d’Elegance events of the time. For this reason he shipped his new Rolls-Royce Silver Wraith to Parisian coachbuilder Joseph Saoutchik, world-famous for his flamboyant creations.

This unique Silver Wraith sedanca coupé won awards at the 1948 Monte Carlo and Deauville Concours d’Elegance, and, fully restored to its original specifi cation, won again awards at the 2010 Pebble Beach and 2011 Amelia Island events.

When David Brown decided to radically change the styling of the Aston Martin granturismo the logical choice was for one of the leading Italian coachbuilders, the famous Carrozzeria Touring in Milan. The elegant lines of the DB4 were designed to be built with the “Superleggera” technology, patented by Touring prior to WWII. The building of the body was licensed to the British coachbuilder Tickford. This DB4 coupé is one of just 17 examples of the Series V built in left-hand drive form.

Never seen in real, the L147 Zagato has been committed by Lamborghini in 1996. The deal between Audi and Lamborghini suspended the program that would have been never revamped. Zagato worked on the Diablo chassis, designing two radiators on the rear part with a very clear aerospace inspiration. The L147 Zagato boasts a very innovative approach and has become a cult for International collectors and special one off lovers.

Ilario Bandini built his first racing cars soon after WWII using Fiat 1100 engines, modified Fiat chassis and barchetta bodies built by Motto. In 1948 he built his fi rst tubular chassis and in 1952 started to modify the 4-cylinder Crosley engine, bored out to 750cc capacity. Thanks to his successes at Italian races and to Tony Pompeo, an Italian-American car dealer well-known in the American racing scene, he started to sell his small sports cars on the important US market.

The “TZ3 program” ends with the delivery of the TZ3 Stradale. It’s is based on the Viper ACR mechanical chassis (640 hp) with a carbon fibre body. “Bellezza necessaria” is the inspiration of this car which matches for the first time an USA power train and can represent the first American Alfa Romeo. It celebrates the road legal heritage of Alfa Romeo Zagato coupés: RLSS, 1500, 1750, 2300 and 2900 Zagato (20s and 30s), 6C 2500 Panoramica, 1900 SSZ and the Giulietta SVZ (40s and 50s), SZ, 2600 SZ!

The first Formula 1 Championship was disputed in 1950 and was won by Nino Farina driving an Alfa Romeo Tipo 158 “Alfetta”. For the 1951 Formula 1 season, the GP car developed into Tipo 159, its in-line 8-cylinder 1.5-liter engine with two-stage supercharger now giving 425 bhp at 9300 rpm. It was built in just four examples and its body was assembled by Carrozzeria Zagato in Milan. Driving one “Alfetta” Tipo 159, the great Argentinean Juan Manuel Fangio easily won the 1951 Formula 1 title.

One-off built on the lowered Sport chassis on order of Sir Malcolm Campbell, the several times holder of the speed land record driving his world-famous Blue Birds. Of course, the car was originally fi nished in blue. In 1938 Campbell sold the car to its second owner, who retained it for 38 years and who in the late Fifties fi tted the engine with a supercharger. Sold in 1979 to the USA, in 1980 the car won its class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

One-off built on the lowered Sport chassis on order of Sir Malcolm Campbell, the several times holder of the speed land record driving his world-famous Blue Birds. Of course, the car was originally fi nished in blue. In 1938 Campbell sold the car to its second owner, who retained it for 38 years and who in the late Fifties fi tted the engine with a supercharger. Sold in 1979 to the USA, in 1980 the car won its class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

One-off built on the lowered Sport chassis on order of Sir Malcolm Campbell, the several times holder of the speed land record driving his world-famous Blue Birds. Of course, the car was originally fi nished in blue. In 1938 Campbell sold the car to its second owner, who retained it for 38 years and who in the late Fifties fi tted the engine with a supercharger. Sold in 1979 to the USA, in 1980 the car won its class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

One-off built on the lowered Sport chassis on order of Sir Malcolm Campbell, the several times holder of the speed land record driving his world-famous Blue Birds. Of course, the car was originally fi nished in blue. In 1938 Campbell sold the car to its second owner, who retained it for 38 years and who in the late Fifties fi tted the engine with a supercharger. Sold in 1979 to the USA, in 1980 the car won its class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

The Bamford & Martin Ltd was founded in 1913 for selling, repairing and building motor cars. Their cars will be called Aston-Martin. In 1925 the company went into receivership and Lionel Martin’s involvement with it ended. In 1926 a new Aston-Martin company was founded with new shareholders, among them The Rt.Hon.Godfrey Rathbone Baron Charnwood. Between 1913 and 1925 just 63 Aston-Martins were built of which eight were Works cars.

The Fiat SB4 Eldridge, better known as “Mephistopheles,” is a racing car built in 1924 by Sir Ernest Eldridge to break speed records. In 1922, John Duff was competing at Brooklands, a racetrack in the county of Surrey, at the wheel of a 1908 Fiat SB4, an old racecar at the end of its career built by the Turin car manufacturer. During the competition, the engine blew and Sir Ernest Eldridge bought the scrap with the aim of turning it into a record-breaking car.

Ilario Bandini built his first racing cars soon after WWII using Fiat 1100 engines, modified Fiat chassis and barchetta bodies built by Motto. In 1948 he built his fi rst tubular chassis and in 1952 started to modify the 4-cylinder Crosley engine, bored out to 750cc capacity. Thanks to his successes at Italian races and to Tony Pompeo, an Italian-American car dealer well-known in the American racing scene, he started to sell his small sports cars on the important US market.

One of just three examples built with the V8 2.6-liter engine, developing 260 bhp, and one of the Works cars for the 1962 season. Driven by Giancarlo Baghetti and Lodovico Scarfi otti, it raced also the 1962 Le Mans 24 Hours: it arrived till to the third position but unfortunately it was forced to retire at the 18th hour for gearbox failure. In June 2007 the car was certifi ed by Ferrari Classiche.

Overview...

Overview...

Just 12 examples of this exclusive Ferrari granturismo were built, with, as can be deduced from the name, the important US market in mind. Fitted with the 4.5-liter V12 engine giving about 300bhp, these cars were not designed for competition but for very fast road use. This car was the fi rst built and was exhibited at the 1953 Paris Motor Show. Restored to original cosmetic specification, light blue with a grey roof as it was finished for Paris, this car has been shown at the 2010 Pebble Beach.

prepared and tuned two Lancia Flavia prototypes for the Targa Florio. Zagato was in charge of the bodies. The company designed and manufactured two brand new cars which were lighter and even more effi cient than the standard version. Highlights of the new racing style were the compact shapes which were obtained by a shortened wheelbase, the typical rounded side rear window, signature of the Lancia Flavia sport Zagato

No information in the catalogue...

The Fiat SB4 Eldridge, better known as “Mephistopheles,” is a racing car built in 1924 by Sir Ernest Eldridge to break speed records. In 1922, John Duff was competing at Brooklands, a racetrack in the county of Surrey, at the wheel of a 1908 Fiat SB4, an old racecar at the end of its career built by the Turin car manufacturer. During the competition, the engine blew and Sir Ernest Eldridge bought the scrap with the aim of turning it into a record-breaking car.

One-off built on the lowered Sport chassis, ordered by the French industrialist Pierre Bosc. In the post-war years the car was exported to the USA and remained under the same ownership from 1952 to 1990. Fully restored, it was shown at the 1992 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance where it was awarded the Road & Track trophy. Subsequently the car became part of the Blackhawk Collection and in 1998 it joined its current owner’s important collection.

Exhibited at the 1956 Brussels Motor Show, the car was sold by famous Ferrari importer Garage Francorchamps in Belgium, where it was raced at some events, driven also by Olivier Gendebien and Jacques Swaters. Following a few ownership transfers, in 2002 the car was bought by the current American owner who had it restored and certified by Ferrari Classiche in 2009. In 2009 the car was awarded “Best Restoration” at the Villa d’Este Concours d’Elegance and in 2010 it was also exhibited at P-Beach.

The first one was built in 1952 for the well-known Italian gentleman driver Ovidio Cappelli who was looking for a car that was lighter and faster than the production 8V designed by Fabio Luigi Rapi. The Cappelli victories convinced Zagato to build a small series of the 8V, which became the car to beat in the GT class. This car was bought new with a standard Fiat body by a Turin enthusiast who resold it in 1956 to the Spanish gentleman driver Sala-Solar.

The first of just five long wheelbase Berlinettas bodied by Zagato and one of three featuring the characteristic “double bubble” roof . Sold new in Italy, the car was extensively raced during the 1956 season, also entering the Mille Miglia, driven by Camillo Luglio. Exported in 1960 to the USA, the car was bought by the current owner in 1999, who over the years exhibited it at several Concours including Pebble Beach, Villa d’Este and Ferrari 60 at the Fiorano circuit in 2007.

Following the success achieved with the Bertone-bodied MG TDs, in 1953 Stanley H. Arnolt, the American importer of several British marques, asked Bertone to design a light body, suitable both on track and road, for the more powerful 2-liter Bristol 404 chassis. Designed by Franco Scaglione, the new roadster created a great sensation at the London Motor Show in October 1953 and at the New York Motor Show in February 1954; both the Competition and DeLuxe versions sold well.

The Alfa Romeo 1900 Super Sprint Zagato represent the maximum expression of Zagato cues in terms of lightweight bodyworks and aerodynamic effi ciency. The very successful but heavy sedan 1900 Berlina was worked from Zagato during the fi rst half of 50s in order to provide the Gentlemen drivers of the GT category with a modern and very effi cient car, designed on the 1900 short wheelbase chassis, offered from Alfa Romeo.

This car is fitted with one of the just 18 “Testa fi ssa” (fi xed head) racing engines built between 1929 and 1930. Bought new by well-known Italian lady driver Anna Maria Peduzzi (aka “Marocchina”), it was extensively raced in the Thirties also running the Mille Miglia in 1934, driven by “Marocchina”- Comotti under Scuderia Ferrari banner, placing 13th overall and 1st in the 1500 class, and 1936, driven by Swiss Emmanuel de Graffenried, when it was a DNF. In 1953 it was imported to the USA.

The first Formula 1 Championship was disputed in 1950 and was won by Nino Farina driving an Alfa Romeo Tipo 158 “Alfetta”. For the 1951 Formula 1 season, the GP car developed into Tipo 159, its in-line 8-cylinder 1.5-liter engine with two-stage supercharger now giving 425 bhp at 9300 rpm. It was built in just four examples and its body was assembled by Carrozzeria Zagato in Milan. Driving one “Alfetta” Tipo 159, the great Argentinean Juan Manuel Fangio easily won the 1951 Formula 1 title.

One-off built on the lowered Sport chassis on order of Sir Malcolm Campbell, the several times holder of the speed land record driving his world-famous Blue Birds. Of course, the car was originally fi nished in blue. In 1938 Campbell sold the car to its second owner, who retained it for 38 years and who in the late Fifties fi tted the engine with a supercharger. Sold in 1979 to the USA, in 1980 the car won its class at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance.

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Back...: The first of just five long wheelbase Berlinettas bodied by Zagato and one of three featuring the characteristic “double bubble” roof . Sold new in Italy, the car was extensively raced during the 1956 season, also entering the Mille Miglia, driven by Camillo Luglio. Exported in 1960 to the USA, the car was bought by the current owner in 1999, who over the years exhibited it at several Concours including Pebble Beach, Villa d’Este and Ferrari 60 at the Fiorano circuit in 2007.

Reviving a collaboration which has produced some of the most beautiful and soughtafter cars in the world, the partnership between Zagato and Aston Martin takes inspiration from the past, to create a modern descendent of classics such as the DB4GT Zagato, V8 Vantage Zagato and DB7 Zagato based on Aston Martin’s ultimate performance interpretation of the Vantage range: the V12 Vantage. Featuring a handcrafted aluminium and carbon fibre body, the V12 Zagato delivers a beautiful and muscular design.

No specifications in Catalogue...

Designed by Pinin Farina and bodied from 1956 to 1957 by Carrozzeria Boano and from 1957 to 1958 by Carrozzeria Ellena in 113 examples, the 250 GT could be regarded as the first production Ferrari car. One of the so-called “low-roof” Boano-bodied 250 GTs, this car is one of very few examples built with an aluminium body. Sold new in Italy, it was raced at the 1957 Mille Miglia by Italian driver Sergio Der Stephanian, who placed 69th overall.

The soft-top touring car is one of the especially rare body models of Mercedes-Benz 500 K and 540 K series. Taking both model versions together, it was built only 28 times, thus accounting for less than 4% of the total 500/540 K production. Technically speaking, the touring car is similar to the other 500 K models built on the so-called normal chassis. In this chassis version, the near 600 kg heavy, eight-cylinder compressor engine sits directly behind the front axle.

Just 12 examples of this exclusive Ferrari granturismo were built, with, as can be deduced from the name, the important US market in mind. Fitted with the 4.5-liter V12 engine giving about 300bhp, these cars were not designed for competition but for very fast road use. This car was the fi rst built and was exhibited at the 1953 Paris Motor Show. Restored to original cosmetic specification, light blue with a grey roof as it was finished for Paris, this car has been shown at the 2010 Pebble Beach.

One-off built on the lowered Sport chassis, ordered by the French industrialist Pierre Bosc. In the post-war years the car was exported to the USA and remained under the same ownership from 1952 to 1990. Fully restored, it was shown at the 1992 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance where it was awarded the Road & Track trophy. Subsequently the car became part of the Blackhawk Collection and in 1998 it joined its current owner’s important collection.

The first of just five long wheelbase Berlinettas bodied by Zagato and one of three featuring the characteristic “double bubble” roof . Sold new in Italy, the car was extensively raced during the 1956 season, also entering the Mille Miglia, driven by Camillo Luglio. Exported in 1960 to the USA, the car was bought by the current owner in 1999, who over the years exhibited it at several Concours including Pebble Beach, Villa d’Este and Ferrari 60 at the Fiorano circuit in 2007. Best of Show 2011 !